What are you reading?

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Inanna
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Inanna »

I read Binti & found it… a bit juvenile. Won’t be continuing it.

Abraham sounds delish, will check him out.
'You just said "your getting shorter": you've obviously been drinking too much ent-draught and not enough Prim's.' - Jude
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Impenitent »

I read the Binti trilogy -it is indeed adolescent. I persevered through the three because I liked the writing and I was curious about the cultural perspective. I can't recall reading any other black African writers.

I also read Noor - thanks for the recommendation Narya. I enjoyed the book though I found the ending tame. Which was disappointing.

I'm now reading Akata Witch, also by Nnedi Okorafor. This is definitely young adult, with an emphasis in young. I don't know whether I'll be able to finish it; I feel like I've given Okorafor a fair shake and if this one doesn't bring it home, I'll give up on her.

I also read The Quiche of Death, by MC Beaton, and freely admit it was the title that tickled me. It's the first in a series of 36 (!!!) books starring protagonist Agatha Raisin, former PR director who fulfils her childhood dream of retiring to a cottage in the Cotswolds only to accidentally embroil herself in a murder by cheating in a local quiche-baking competition in an ill-considered attempt to ingratiate herself in the small village community.

If you want a cozy mystery with some laughs, I recommend it.

Since my last post, I also finished all the Penric and Desdemona books. Enjoyed but not sufficiently to reread in future.

I can recommend Gail Carriger's first non-fiction The Heroine's Journey: For Writers, Readers and Fans of Pop Culture. An excellent contrast to the Hero's journey that literary analysis usually uses as a lens.

Have I recommended At the Edge of the Haight, by Katherine Seligman? More or less contemporary fiction, set in San Francisco, with protagonist a young woman living rough who witnesses a murder. The focus of the novel is not the murder but rather, the nature of her day-to-day life, her immediate circle and the nature and psychology of those relationships. It makes real the lives of people who are usually relegated to the edges.
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Frelga »

I'm giving Brandon Sanderson another try with The Well of Ascension. I really wish he'd learn some action signifiers other than frowned, paused, nodded, and smiled. I kid you not, it's a complete list.
Last edited by Frelga on Sat Apr 30, 2022 11:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
His philosophy was a mixture of three famous schools -- the Cynics, the Stoics and the Epicureans -- and summed up all three of them in his famous phrase, 'You can't trust any bugger further than you can throw him, and there's nothing you can do about it, so let's have a drink."

Terry Pratchett, Small Gods
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Inanna
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Inanna »

Lol! I still haven’t read the last book of that very long war series.

I’m re-reading Jemisin’s broken earth. It can be really depressing. :(
'You just said "your getting shorter": you've obviously been drinking too much ent-draught and not enough Prim's.' - Jude
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Maria
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Maria »

I just finished The Kaiju Preservation Society and really like it.
https://us.macmillan.com/books/97807653 ... ionsociety

It's the first novel I've read with Covid times incorporated into it. Despite that it's a fun read. :)

I'm a tad confused, though... because when I was looking for a description to post, all the reviews said the protagonist was a man. :scratch: I listened to the whole book thinking she was a woman. :) It doesn't make a difference to the story, really. But it does explain why they got a man to read it. :D Will Wheaton does an excellent job as narrator, as always.
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Frelga »

It sounds intriguing. I noticed that book's blurb calls the protagonist Jamie througout without ever using pronouns. Sounds like the book leaves it to the reader to assume Jamie's gender?
His philosophy was a mixture of three famous schools -- the Cynics, the Stoics and the Epicureans -- and summed up all three of them in his famous phrase, 'You can't trust any bugger further than you can throw him, and there's nothing you can do about it, so let's have a drink."

Terry Pratchett, Small Gods
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Maria
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Maria »

Maybe so? With an audiobook I'd have to listen to the whole thing again to see if there are any clues.
It's times like this when I miss having a physical book I can riffle through the pages.
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Maria »

I just went to amazon and looked at the first 14 pages as a free preview and there's no hint of the gender of the protagonist. That has to be deliberate. I feel justified in my assumption.
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Frelga »

Interesting! On audiobook, it's hard to find a narrator whose gender isn't obvious from their voice, but it would be cool if they tried.

For my comfort listen, I've been listening to the Amelia Peabody books, but both my libraries have a big gap in the middle of the series.
His philosophy was a mixture of three famous schools -- the Cynics, the Stoics and the Epicureans -- and summed up all three of them in his famous phrase, 'You can't trust any bugger further than you can throw him, and there's nothing you can do about it, so let's have a drink."

Terry Pratchett, Small Gods
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Voronwë the Faithful »

Frelga wrote: Wed May 11, 2022 3:06 pm It sounds intriguing. I noticed that book's blurb calls the protagonist Jamie throughout without ever using pronouns. Sounds like the book leaves it to the reader to assume Jamie's gender?
That does appear to be the case, at least according to this review at Kirkus Reviews: https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-revi ... n-society/
A great tree may outlive many a Man, and may remember the seed from which it came ere all the Men that now walk the earth were yet unborn, but the rind upon which you lay your hand, and the leaves which overshadow you, are not as that seed was, nor as the dry wood shall be that decays into the mould or passes in flame. And other trees there are that stand about each different in growth and in shape, according to the chances of their lives, though all be akin, offspring of one yet older tree and sprung therefore from a single seed of long ago.
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Maria
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Maria »

I will take their word for it that gender is never specified. :)
It was funny. At lunch I asked my husband what gender he thought the protagonist was. He said, "A guy, of course."
Both of us, listening at the same time at the same pace just assumed that Jamie was our own gender.
We boggled at that for a moment, but really, it doesn't make a difference to the story.
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by RoseMorninStar »

Maria wrote: Wed May 11, 2022 6:21 pm I will take their word for it that gender is never specified. :)
It was funny. At lunch I asked my husband what gender he thought the protagonist was. He said, "A guy, of course."
Both of us, listening at the same time at the same pace just assumed that Jamie was our own gender.
We boggled at that for a moment, but really, it doesn't make a difference to the story.
Nice!
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Impenitent »

Perfect example of unconscious bias! We all have them, of course.
Mornings wouldn't suck so badly if they came later in the day.
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Inanna
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Inanna »

Hey Impish!
'You just said "your getting shorter": you've obviously been drinking too much ent-draught and not enough Prim's.' - Jude
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Re: What are you reading?

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'Huggles Inanna'
Mornings wouldn't suck so badly if they came later in the day.
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Re: What are you reading?

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I took a break halfway through Sanderson's characters nodding, pausing, smiling, and frowning because Carpet People hold came up.

As the foreword says, it was co-written by the 17yo Terry Pratchett and the 43yo Terry Pratchett. At 43, when people who couldn't get enough Pratchett discovered that his first book was out of print, he decided to "clean it up a bit" the result being something neither Pratchett would have written alone.

It's delightful both as a fantasy book written for children and as a Pratchett book. At the end are the original stories that the 17yo Terry read to the children's reading circle.

17yo Pratchett was already a better writer than Sanderson is now.
His philosophy was a mixture of three famous schools -- the Cynics, the Stoics and the Epicureans -- and summed up all three of them in his famous phrase, 'You can't trust any bugger further than you can throw him, and there's nothing you can do about it, so let's have a drink."

Terry Pratchett, Small Gods
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Inanna
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Inanna »

Lol. You are right about the last bit.

It’s one of Irikas fav books.
'You just said "your getting shorter": you've obviously been drinking too much ent-draught and not enough Prim's.' - Jude
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Frelga »

Has she read Tiffany Aching books yet?
His philosophy was a mixture of three famous schools -- the Cynics, the Stoics and the Epicureans -- and summed up all three of them in his famous phrase, 'You can't trust any bugger further than you can throw him, and there's nothing you can do about it, so let's have a drink."

Terry Pratchett, Small Gods
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Dave_LF »

Frelga wrote:I'm giving Brandon Sanderson another try with The Well of Ascension. I really wish he'd learn some action signifiers other than frowned, paused, nodded, and smiled. I kid you not, it's a complete list.
Mistborn reads like an earlier version of Stormlight that doesn’t take itself quite so seriously. At least at first :roll:. Same goes for Wax and Wayne—the story began as a writing exercise and is actually a lot of fun. Then he decided to turn it into another tetralogy, and you can almost feel where it takes a turn for the ponderous.
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Re: What are you reading?

Post by Frelga »

Sanderson is just basic. There is a fun plot in there somewhere, and the magic system is well thought out (with an asterisk for the protagonist who keeps discovering new powers she has, but I'm willing to allow that there may be a reason for that), but there is no depth to imagery, characterization, or ideas. It could still be good entertainment, if it wasn't so interminable.

I'm also stalled on the third Iron Druid book, Hammered. The series is an example of what I mean by good entertainment without being that deep. And it has fun mythology references. But I'm not in the right brainspace for it.

I went through two more Vorkosigan books. I could have done without the torture porn in Mirror Dance, and Memory felt slow in places, but overall they were solid. I feel like Ivan doesn't get enough credit from anyone, given how often he has to rescue Miles.
His philosophy was a mixture of three famous schools -- the Cynics, the Stoics and the Epicureans -- and summed up all three of them in his famous phrase, 'You can't trust any bugger further than you can throw him, and there's nothing you can do about it, so let's have a drink."

Terry Pratchett, Small Gods
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